INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN NUTRITION PDF

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Introduction to. Human Nutrition. Second Edition. Edited on behalf of The Nutrition Society by. Michael J Gibney. Susan A Lanham-New. Aedin Cassidy. C, including most of the features included in the current ANSI standard. All of the programming SCHAUM'S OUTLINE OF T. Allen, David. Getting things done: the art of stress-free productivity / David Allen anything fall through the cracks. Introduction to Human Nutrition 2nd Edition.


Introduction To Human Nutrition Pdf

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In this Second Edition of the introductory text in the acclaimed Nutrition Society Textbook Series, Introduction to Human Nutrition has been revised and updated . Request PDF on ResearchGate | On Jan 1, , Nicola M. Lowe and others published Introduction to Human Nutrition. Introduction. Chapter 1. An introduction to human nutrition. • An adequate provision of all nutrients in the correct proportions is a prerequisite for health.

Fukagawa and Y. Nutrition Research Methodology. Food Safety: Reilly, C. Tlustos, J. Food and Nutrition-Related Diseases: The Global Challenge. Vorster and M. Undetected country.

Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition

NO YES. Selected type: Added to Your Shopping Cart. Evaluation Copy Request an Evaluation Copy. In this Second Edition of the introductory text in the acclaimed Nutrition Society Textbook Series, Introduction to Human Nutrition has been revised and updated to meet the needs of the contemporary student. Groundbreaking in their scope and approach, the titles in the series: Provide students with the required scientific basics of nutrition in the context of a systems and health approach Enable teachers and students to explore the core principles of nutrition, to apply these throughout their training, and to foster critical thinking at all times.

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Table of contents 1. Introduction to Human Nutrition: A Global Perspective on Food and Nutrition. These fats are considered to be harmful to your health. Trans fats are found mainly in deep-fried fast foods and processed foods made with margarine.

Fats are a concentrated and rich source of energy. The rest of your fat intake should consist of monounsaturated fat. Vitamins Vitamins constitute a group of nutrients that are needed in small quantities.

Like amino and fatty acids, most vitamins cannot be made in the body and must be obtained from dietary sources. Only vitamin D can be manufactured by the body.

Human nutrition

Essential vitamins are grouped into two families: water soluble and fat soluble. Water soluble vitamins can dissolve in water thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin C , folic acid. These cannot be stored by the body and need to be consumed every day. Fat soluble vitamins can dissolve in a fat medium vitamins A, D, E , K.

These are taken into our bodies when we consume fat-containing foods. Vitamins are needed for various reasons, including the formation of hormones and blood cells. They generally act as coenzymes. An inadequate supply of vitamins in our diet leads to the development of diseases. Vitamin A: Derived from carotene, vitamin A affects vision, reproduction, and the formation and maintenance of skin , mucous membranes , bones and teeth. Deficiency results in night blindness difficulty in adapting to darkness.

The body obtains vitamin A from either carotene vitamin A precursor or by absorbing ready-made vitamin A from plant-eating organisms. Pre formed vitamin A is found in milk, butter, cheese, egg yolk, liver, and fish-liver oil. Vitamin B complex: The vitamin B complex is a mixture of eight essential vitamins necessary to enhance immune and nervous system function, and promote cell growth and division.

Pregnant or lactating women, alcoholics and the elderly are more likely to suffer from vitamin B deficiency. Vitamin B1 thiamine : Thiamine, or vitamin B1 , acts as a catalyst in carbohydrate metabolism. Thiamine deficiency causes beriberi, a vitamin deficiency disorder characterised by muscular weakness, swelling of the heart and leg cramps.

In severe cases, beriberi may lead to heart failure and death. Vitamin B2 riboflavin : Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and respiratory proteins.

The best sources of riboflavin are liver, milk, meat, dark green vegetables, whole grain and enriched cereals, pasta, bread and mushrooms. Vitamin B6 pyroxidine : Pyridoxine, or vitamin B6 , is necessary for the absorption and metabolism of amino acids. The best sources of pyridoxine are whole grains, cereals, bread, liver, avocados, spinach, green beans and bananas. Folic acid vitamin B9 or folacin : Folic acid is a coenzyme needed for forming body protein and haemoglobin.

Folic acid deficiency is associated with neural tube defects. Folic acid is lost in foods stored at room temperature and during cooking. Minerals Minerals are essential, acting as cofactors of enzymes i. Some fatty acids, but not all, are essential in the diet: they cannot be synthesized in the body. Protein molecules contain nitrogen atoms in addition to carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. The fundamental components of protein are nitrogen-containing amino acids , some of which are essential in the sense that humans cannot make them internally.

Introduction to Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition

Some of the amino acids are convertible with the expenditure of energy to glucose and can be used for energy production, just as ordinary glucose, in a process known as gluconeogenesis. By breaking down existing protein, the carbon skeleton of the various amino acids can be metabolized to intermediates in cellular respiration; the remaining ammonia is discarded primarily as urea in urine.

Main article: Carbohydrate Carbohydrates may be classified as monosaccharides , disaccharides , or polysaccharides depending on the number of monomer sugar units they contain. They constitute a large part of foods such as rice , noodles , bread , and other grain -based products, also potatoes , yams, beans, fruits, fruit juices and vegetables. Monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides contain one, two, and three or more sugar units, respectively.

Polysaccharides are often referred to as complex carbohydrates because they are typically long, multiple branched chains of sugar units.

Traditionally, simple carbohydrates are believed to be absorbed quickly, and therefore to raise blood-glucose levels more rapidly than complex carbohydrates. This, however, is not accurate. Like all carbohydrates, when it is metabolized it can produce four Calories kilocalories of energy per gram. However, in most circumstances it accounts for less than that because of its limited absorption and digestibility. Dietary fiber consists mainly of cellulose, a large carbohydrate polymer which is indigestible as humans do not have the required enzymes to disassemble it.

There are two subcategories: soluble and insoluble fiber. Whole grains, fruits especially plums , prunes , and figs , and vegetables are good sources of dietary fiber. There are many health benefits of a high-fiber diet. Dietary fiber helps reduce the chance of gastrointestinal problems such as constipation and diarrhea by increasing the weight and size of stool and softening it. Insoluble fiber, found in whole wheat flour , nuts and vegetables, especially stimulates peristalsis — the rhythmic muscular contractions of the intestines, which move digest along the digestive tract.

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Soluble fiber, found in oats, peas, beans, and many fruits, dissolves in water in the intestinal tract to produce a gel that slows the movement of food through the intestines. This may help lower blood glucose levels because it can slow the absorption of sugar.

Additionally, fiber, perhaps especially that from whole grains, is thought to possibly help lessen insulin spikes, and therefore reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. The link between increased fiber consumption and a decreased risk of colorectal cancer is still uncertain.Enzymes biological catalysts , antibodies and hormones also consist of protein. Cunnane and B.

Insoluble fiber, found in whole wheat flour , nuts and vegetables, especially stimulates peristalsis — the rhythmic muscular contractions of the intestines, which move digest along the digestive tract. If your energy intake equals the amount of energy you expend, then you are in energy balance.

Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Additionally, fiber, perhaps especially that from whole grains, is thought to possibly help lessen insulin spikes, and therefore reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. For example, monounsaturated fatty acids e.